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Arlington Heights employment law attorneys, employment at willIllinois is an employment at will state. That means employers do not have to provide a reason for termination to their employees. However, there are important limitations and exclusions that employers should know about before they terminate an employee. The following information explains the laws and provisions, and where employers can find help with ensuring they are compliant with Illinois state law.

Discrimination and Termination

Employers cannot terminate an employee for reasons related to race, color, marital status, physical or mental disability, gender, religion, ancestry, citizenship status, national origin, age, or military status. So, although they do not need an official reason to terminate an employee, it is usually preferred that employers do have documentation to back up their reason. This can provide protection in the event of a discrimination lawsuit.

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Arlington Heights employment law attorneys, tax withholding, record-keeping lawsWhen business is booming and you know you need to hire someone to fill the gap, it is easy to get excited. However, you cannot let that excitement cloud your judgment. There are critical employment law specifics you need to know before hiring your first employee. Some of the most critical relate to tax withholding and record-keeping requirements.

Preparing for the Hiring Phase

Before you can hire an employee, you must first obtain an employer identification number (EIN). This number is used for tax reporting purposes, and it is required for submitting certain documents to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). You also need it to report information about your employees to the state. In addition, keep in mind that you will need to keep records of employment, tax withholding, deductible expenses, and other financial and employment-related information for a minimum of four years.

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Arlington Heights small business attorneys, paying your sales staff,Running a small business is no easy task; not only do you need to offer a unique product or service, abide by all tax laws, and cover the cost of your overhead, but you must also ensure your employees are happy. To accomplish that, you need to know how to pay them. In regards to sales staff, there are two types of compensation: salary and incentive. Which one is right or your small business? The following information may help you decide.

Laws May Dictate Your Decision

While, ideally, you want to offer a compensation package that offers employees incentive without breaking your budget, there are guidelines that must be adhered to under the law. Depending on your business and location, these laws may dictate the type of compensation you can offer. At the very least, the laws will need to be considered. As such, employers should ensure they have a firm understanding of all applicable labor laws.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_employee-handbook-Arlington-Heights-.jpgEmployee handbooks are like welcome packages for your employees. They outline what you expect from your employees and communicate what your employees can expect from you. Yet it is important to recognize the potential implications of a poorly written employee handbook. The following explains these risks, and provides you with information on how to avoid them.

Employee Handbook Basics

At minimum, you want your employee handbook to make clear that your company complies with the anti-discrimination and harassment laws, and that you are compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act. In conjunction with this, you should document your expectations on ethics and conduct. This can give you the chance to reiterate your stance on harassment and discrimination. However, you may also need to outline issues that may be regulated (i.e. food safety, environmental regulations, etc.).

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Arlington Heights business law attorneys, Americans with Disabilities ActIn the United States, all businesses with 15 or more employees must comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which protects workers with disabilities from discrimination within the workplace. Any failure to do so can result in hefty fines and penalties, and may even result in a discrimination lawsuit against your business. The following can help you avoid such consequences by providing you with information on how to ensure your policies are in line with the ADA requirements.

Protection Against Discrimination 

Under the ADA, individuals with disabilities and their family members are protected from discrimination in hiring, termination, and opportunities for advancement. This means you cannot deny employment to someone based on a disability, or the disability of a loved one. It also means you cannot terminate someone because he or she, or a loved one, has a disability. Individuals with disabilities and employees who have a loved one with a disability must also receive the same consideration when it comes to advancements and promotions within the company. 

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